FREE Social Media Web Event

Does social media ever feel like a waste of time?

Like you’re spinning your wheels?

Not getting traction? No clicks, likes, fans, or opens?

You might be making some crucial mistakes you’re not even aware of. Mistakes that could be costing you customers, web traffic, clicks, and engagement. Good news: You can fix your mistakes. Better news: It’ll take you less than an hour to do so.

Join the web event “The 7 Social Media Mistakes You’re Making and How to Fix Them” hosted by Think Digital Academy founder, Justin Wise. I’ve learned so much from Justin the past couple years and I have no doubt he is going to do a slam dunk job with this web event.

On this web event, you’ll learn:

1. Where 80% of your social media results (more purchases, traffic, members, etc.) will come from.

2. What an editorial calendar is and why virtually nobody uses one.

3. Why “engaging the conversation” is the worse social media strategy on the planet.

4. Why online influence is more important than ever.

5. How to instantly improve your search engine rankings with social media.

PLUS, you’ll get exclusive access to a 14-minute interview with New York Times bestseller and social media powerhouse, Gary Vaynerchuk. Gary’s worked with some of the top brands in the world and shares some of the biggest social media mistakes he sees.

Registration is free. Anyone can sign-up.
Get more details and join this exclusive web event by clicking here.

Strategy?! Ain’t Nobody Got Time for That!

If you find that you “ain’t got time for that” then I encourage you to make time. This is so important and should actually help guide you in some way, shape or form towards a more developed communications strategy. I want to share with you some steps I have had to learn over and over again when figuring out how to develop and carry out a strategy. These are by no means perfect and I am sure compared to some of the experts, I have left out something. The cool thing about these steps is that I can use them constantly. I have to remember that communications strategy is an ongoing process,

# 1. Your vision – Make it known.

This is the most important step. Without a vision, nothing is communicated. Clarify, cast and integrate your vision.

#2. Your Priorities – What is important?

Separate what is important into levels. (Yes, everything is important but if you don’t set priorities then everything becomes important, which in turn makes nothing important.) Communications levels can be decided by the team in the order of importance. Use verbiage like “Big Days” would always let me know what was a level one. Levels can be decided into examples like this:

Level One:  Easter, Christmas Eve/Day, Giving, Vision Casting, etc. Its going to be something that is going to impact at least 80-85% of the church.

Level Two:  VBS, Student Camps, D-Now’s, Men/Women’s events, Promotion etc. A major ministry event that is aimed toward a large majority of your people.

Level Three:  Women’s Bible study, Men’s breakfast, Celebrate Recovery, etc. This pretty much is everything else. Things that are reoccurring throughout the year.

#3. Your Channels

What communication channels are most important? You should choose between 2-4 channels. (Social media – you should start out with 2-3 channels of this as well – blog, newsletter, email, announcements, etc.) This should be based on your vision and overall audience. (Note: I italicized two very important ones. You’re welcome!)

#4. Your Audience – Who you talking to?!

Whose is your audience? Make sure to have this written down.

#5. Your End Result – See, what had happened was…

Did this turn out the way you initially wanted? Identify what you want the win to be and then use that to measure your results.

#6. Adjust

This just means to start over and constantly have this process being followed throughout your church or organization.

My Go-To Books.

communications_gotolist

A lot of my learning I gained from reading books and learning from others.  I created this list of books for anyone involved in not only church communications, but ministry in general. Each of these books will definitely help you communicate your church’s vision and message with intentionality, with simplicity, and overall with effectiveness. I know they have definitely helped me.

–> Check out My Go-To List of books <– What books would you add? 

Church Communications – What is that??

Anything people read, touch, or click is considered communications. Maybe there is something to add to that, but I haven’t really found that yet. When it comes to church communications I think this is crucial because:

  • Read would include any written messages communicated from or about the church…be it in print or electronic form.
  • Touch would include a weekly bulletin, newsletter, brochures, mass mailings/postcards, or anything else that represents the church or has the church logo on it…in print form.
  • Click would relate to any form of web or email based technology, as well as new social media tools like Twitter, Facebook, etc.

The role of church communications is changing…it’s no longer about a church secretary typing announcements into a pre-printed bulletin shell. Church communications now involves a lot of planning, strategy and people who are focused on directing the different communications channels of a church. In 2 words, hard work. There are some churches that have started to see the need and importance of having a full time staff member as a communications director. The director of communications is responsible for managing and directing a church’s internal and external communications. They work to create communication strategies and (depending on their role or level of authority) serve as the key spokesperson and media contact for the organization. The director of communications typically reports to an executive pastor and/or lead pastor. They handle all messaging in the church outside of the Sunday morning messages and work to build teams to support all facets of church communications (print, media, web, etc.).  They are passionate about the church’s vision and care about how it translates to people inside and outside of the church. They defend it. They design it. They care about it.

The local church is the hope of the world. I believe it has the greatest message that’s out there, the message of the Gospel. And with that, the greatest message deserves the greatest marketing, creativity, and storytelling. If there is one thing I am learning from school is that marketers spend millions of dollars every single year to tell us that our lives would be better or enhanced with the products, services, or ideas they are selling. I know that we are not about selling salvation as a product. The goal of the church is not to try and woo people to our ‘services’ (haha) or trying to convince them to convert or whatever….we are about seeing the trajectory of people’s lives changed. Seeing hearts surrendered to Jesus. Being a young person, I have the privilege and curse of being part of the generation that has made it harder and harder to communicate with. The cool thing is…with that comes the challenge of communicating the unchanging, timeless message of the Gospel in way that is relevant and compelling to the culture of its time.

Watch this video:

That commercial was for a WEB BROWSER. Google Chrome. What? Wow. Why didn’t they focus on the features and explain why Google Chrome is better than the rest or the best for you to use? Because Google understands the power of storytelling. They focused us on the story of Sophie and her Dad. They wanted us to watch it, get attached, say a few “aww” and “how sweet!” and emotionally connect with it. Less product. More story. Well, it worked for me.

What message are the experiences people have with your church communicating?

What does your marketing say about you and your church?

Is there a disconnect between what you say and what people experience?

What if Starbucks marketed like churches do? Watch this video: